Democracy in Crisis in North America

There has been a coup in the United States. Or rather, to put it grammatically correct, there was a coup that has helped the shutdown of the American government. This cause was made by a simple change in the rules of the House of Representatives where, instead of allowing any member to forward a motion to resume the government, only the leader of the party majority may put forward such motion. This was made in the dead of night without any debate or oversight. In other words, the GOP of the United States has seized power, and is trying to transform their congress into Canada’s parliament, where parliament is not controlled equally by all members of the legislature, but by party leaders with MPs serving as mere puppets under threat of expulsion from the party if they fail to toe the line.

Canadians, perpetually arrogant and self-blind (the very reason why we live under monarchy and a half-formed yet misshapen constitution), fail to understand that our own government has been shut down, that democracy in its current fragmented state has been suspended, in the name of the whim of an executive who has shown us an example why term limits are important to a democracy. While a House Majority Leader is different from a Prime Minister, it nonetheless is an attempt to inch America away from a congressional legislature to a parliamentary one. And while parliaments may be entertaining when the business of a legislature is to govern, they are not as democratic as a congressional legislature, which is what a proper republic wound need in order to function.

Finally, in Ontario, lest we forget, the Privy Council under the unrepentant Dalton McGimpy did something similar by imposing a secret law on the province, without any debate or oversight by the provincial legislature, that expanded police powers dramatically, and that Canadians in Ontario are still living under.

Sometimes, it’s the small things that can have huge consequences.

The Republican Party ≠ Republican

Like any decent human being, I completely despise conservatives and royalists. I also despise the GOP. So much so, that I refuse to call them by their formal name. Why so? Because they are in no way, shape or form, republican in the true sense. The concept of a republic, in fact, is actually a very liberal, very leftist concept of government, being that the executive and legislative branches are vested in the control and consent of the citizens. Because people in the English-speaking realms of the North American continent, who are easily confused thanks to their lack of attention span, memory and education, literally believe that the very word “republican” implies or means that you’re a member of the GOP or its mindset. Nevermind if you’re an American. I’m talking about Canadians who have been saturated with American TV, and who are either fellow haters of the GOP and conservatives, or who are conservatives that can’t seem to grasp that the GOP is republican in name only. Some Canadians are so stupid they confuse it with the far right, and have caused many Canadian leftists to take pride in what is essentially an non-egalitarian and non-democratic institution, the monarchy, as somehow the sole protector of our liberties . . . rather than something better, like the law. But alas, the republican left has been silenced by patriotic Canadians who are either too sad or too stupid to know the damn difference between republican and royalist. The GOP is in fact royalist, elitist, classist, and anything that hinders the liberty equality of all; it just uses liberal, leftist rhetoric to confuse people. That’s why I never use the word “Republican” when I speak of the GOP, and republicans of all political stripes in Canada (yes, even a small minority of conservatives despise monarchy as much as I do, though unlike myself, they see monarchy as an utter failure to stop the tides of democracy) should make it clear with their readers, listeners, and viewers.

I’m so sick of repeating myself over and over. After all, you have this blog to sift through to figure out where I stand when it comes to that most evil of institutions, with corporations, mob rule, and theocracies or the influence of religion in politics almost immediately before it. In a way I am damnwell elitist: I want the best and brightest, but who come from all walks of life, to govern, not just anyone. I mean, look at what happened with George Bush II when he continued the Bush dynasty. The more a person is intelligent yet hesitant or resistant to hold office, the more worthy they are to hold office, for they would be the most cautious to use any power given to them.